Pregnancy and Infant Loss Facts

 

MISCARRIAGE

  • A miscarriage is when a baby dies in the womb before 20 weeks gestation. Some miscarriages happen before a woman realizes she is pregnant.

  • The cause of all miscarriages is not known, but most miscarriages are a result of a genetic/chromosomal abnormality.

  • For women who know they are pregnant, about 10 to 15 in 100 pregnancies (10%-15%) will end in miscarriage. Most of these occur in the first trimester (prior to 12 weeks gestation).

  • Second trimester miscarriages (13 weeks to 19 weeks gestation) occur in 1 to 5 out of 100 pregnancies (1%-5%).

  • Most women who miscarry go on the have healthy pregnancies in the future.

ECTOPIC

  • An ectopic pregnancy occurs when an embryo (fertilized egg) grows outside the womb. This mostly occurs in the fallopian tube or attached to an ovary.

  • An ectopic always ends in pregnancy loss.

  • Ectopic pregnancies occur in about 1 out of 50 pregnancies (2%) in the United States.

  • Most women who have an ectopic pregnancy go on to have healthy pregnancies in the future.

MOLAR PREGNANCY

  • A molar pregnancy is a tumor that develops in the uterus at the beginning of a pregnancy.

  • If not treated, it can be dangerous. It almost always ends in pregnancy loss.

  • In a molar pregnancy, the placenta does not form correctly and develops into a mass of cysts. It cannot properly supply the baby with food and oxygen like it can in a normal pregnancy.

  • About 1 in 1,000 pregnancies (less than 1%) is a molar pregnancy in the United States.

  • The risk of having another molar pregnancy is about 1 to 2 in 100 women (1%-2%).

  • After a molar pregnancy, most women will have a normal pregnancy in the future.

STILLBIRTH

  • Stillbirth is when a baby dies in the womb after 20 weeks gestation.

  • Most stillbirths occur before a women goes into labor, but a small number occur during labor and delivery.

  • The cause of most stillbirths is unknown but some can be related to infection, birth defects and pregnancy complications such as some medical conditions.

  • Stillbirth occurs in about 1 in 100 pregnancies (1%) each year in the United States which is approximately 24,000 babies.

  • Less than 1 in 100 women (less than 1%) who have had a stillbirth go on to have another stillbirth.

  • Most women who have a stillbirth will have a normal pregnancy in the future.

NEONATAL DEATH

  • Neonatal death is when a baby passes away in the first 28 days of life.

  • The most common causes are premature birth (born prior to 37 weeks gestation), low birth weight (born weighing less than 5lbs 8oz) and birth defects (health conditions present at birth).

    • Premature birth and low birth weight cause approximately 1 in 4 neonatal deaths (25%).

    • Birth defects cause approximately 1 in 5 neonatal deaths (20%).

  • Neonatal death happens in about 4 in 1,000 babies (less than 1%) each year in the United States.

 

 

References:

March of Dimes. (2017 November) Miscarriage Retrieved from https://www.marchofdimes.org/complications/miscarriage.aspx

March of Dimes. (2017 October) Ectopic Pregnancy Retrieved from https://www.marchofdimes.org/complications/ectopic-pregnancy.aspx

March of Dimes. (2017 October) Molar Pregnancy Retrieved from https://www.marchofdimes.org/complications/molar-pregnancy.aspx

March of Dimes. (2017 October) Stillbirth Retrieved from https://www.marchofdimes.org/complications/stillbirth.aspx

March of Dimes. (2017 October) Neonatal Death Retrieved from https://www.marchofdimes.org/complications/neonatal-death.aspx